Greg & Liuba Tarver
Bells Bridge Queensland 4570

Congratulations, you have decided to have a Bullmastiff puppy- the most unique and special dog. Just as expectant parents prepare for their baby, you should ready home for the arrival of Bullmastiff pup.

Puppy-proofing your home

Before bringing your puppy home you must make sure it is safe and secure. Here are some tips to help keep him out of harm way:

  • Store breakable items safely out of the way.

  • Hide or cover electrical cords so he won’t chew on them

  • Keep kid’s toys off the floor, since some parts may be small enough for your puppy to swallow.

  • Use a cover and/or protective fencing if you have a pool or a hot tub.

  • A 5- to 6-foot- high fence should be adequate to contain an agile youngster or adult Bullmastiff.

  • The garage and shed can be hazardous place for a pup so keep these areas off limits to the pup.

  • Store all detergents and chemicals out of your puppy’s reach.

Taking your puppy home with you

Here is list of supplies you will need to have on hand when you bring your puppy home with you:

  • Complete and balanced premium puppy food ( see Choosing food).

  • Treats for training.

  • Stainless steel, non-tipping food and water bowls( they sterilize better and puppy is less inclined to chew on the metal)

  • I.D. tag with your and your vet’s phone numbers

  • A lightweight nylon collar and a 6-foot nylon lead

  • Brushes, combs and dog shampoo.

  • Cleaning supplies such as stain remover, paper towels, dust pan, broom and a deodorising spray.

  • Bed ( old towel or blankets are good choices for puppy, since he may and probable will have a toileting accidents or decide to chew on the bedding material. Once he is fully trained and out of the early chewing stage you can replace the puppy bedding with some type of soft bedding

  • Toy to entertain their curious brains. ( The best ‘’chewcifiers’’ are hard rubber and nylon bones, which are safe to gnaw on and come in different size. Be careful of natural bones which can splinter or develop dangerous sharp edges. Pup can easily swallow or choke on the splinter)

Dangerous plants for dogs

Restrict access to plants that are dangerous to the dog:


Poinsettia


Azaleas


Rhododendron


Madagascar Jasmine


Dumb-Cane


Japanese Yew


English Ivy




The journey to new home
  • Take a towel when you collect your puppy to rub it on mum and littermate to take some of their sent. It helps him to familiarise his new environments

  • Take some paper towel and a plastic bag – just in case your puppy get car-sick.

  • Before setting off spend some time with him in the car to allow him to become accustomed to his new and strange surroundings, use praise and reward him for being calm

  • Often a puppy’s second trip in a car is to see the vet for vaccination, so it is important to make his first journey a positive experience.

Sleeping and eating arrangement
  • Choose wisely where new puppy sleeps

  • Give him a designated area with suitable dog bedding to sleep in

  • Choose a place for him to eat with enough room for food and water bowl

  • Always ensure fresh water is available for him

Choosing food

REMEMBER- your puppy can ONLY reach his/her optimum potential with your help. The proper nutrition will enhance his/her genetic potential.

We highly suggest that you read the dog food labels, and beware the advertising propaganda. Always remember the quality of the food will show on your puppy’s skin, coat and growth. . The higher quality, concentrated premium dog foods are STRONGLY RECOMMENDED…they may cost a little more per bag, but they are concentrated, have a higher digestibility rate, and the puppy will have firm to soft smaller stools…PLEASE DON’T SKIMP ON THE FOOD.

We ask you to AVOID PRODUCTS with corn as a 1st-4th ingredient; corn because it is nothing more than a filler, high in sugar with no nutritional value and wheat because some puppies (and adults) are allergic; or basically products containing chemical preservatives; maintain protein levels at 21%-25% and fat levels at 15%+. We recommend that you keep the protein levels as close to 22% up until 18 months of age. At this point in time you may increase the protein levels up to 25% if the dog is an active dog, show dog, etc.

Guide to my preferred feeding regime

PLEASE, PLEASE always use an actual “Measuring Cup” when measuring out dry dog food. There many advantages from using this method, one is that a measuring cup is “ACCURATE!” You will always know the puppy’s food for the rest of his/her life, and you will always know “EXACTLY” how much food your dog is getting, eating, or leaving in the bowl.

There is no “WILD GUESSES.”

Other obvious reasons for using a measuring cup are:

(1) Is your puppy or adult dog losing weight ?, (2) gaining weight ?,

(3) vomiting ?, (4) diarrhea ?,

(5) bloating ?, (6) illnesses ?

Feeding schedule

Puppies, like children, need to be on a “ROUTINE” schedule for feeding and all daily functions. Please try to keep to a set pattern of feeding times for LIFE. Here is one example:

  • BREAKFAST (puppies and adults) 7:00 a.m.

  • MID-MORING “TREAT” (puppies only) – Yoghurt 10:00 a.m.

  • LUNCH (puppies only)12:00 p.m .

  • MID-AFTERNOON “TREAT” (puppies only) – Scrambled, boiled or fried egg 3:00 p.m.

  • DINNER (puppies and adults) 6:00 p.m.

Raw eggs should never be given, particularly egg white

Based on your “work” or “family” schedule, you will have to adjust the times, remember though, the last meal is the one that “sets” the pattern for housebreaking a puppy.
Example: Any meal/fluid consumption after 6:oo p.m. only leaves a few hours for elimination before “bedtime” (his/hers and yours)! Keep in mind that it may take several weeks for your puppy to learn to “HOLD” everything through the night. If your are having difficulty, remember to remove all fluids by 7:00 p.m.
Also important to consider is that most puppies have to relieve themselves almost IMMEDIATELY following a meal.

Other helpful hints:

It is important not to elevate their food and water bowls, so that the puppy/dog has to reach into the bowl to eat or drink. Large breeds are subject to bloat and recent studies have found that lower food bowls seems to help with food digestion.

The type of bowls that we have the puppies/dogs eat and drink out of are stainless steel rounded bottom (5) quart mixing bowls. The Bullmastiff has a square muzzle with a slight under bite making it is difficult for them to eat out of a flat bottom bowl. The lowered feeding system help with the development of their bites, neck and shoulder muscles, as well as, their front pasterns for tight cat-like toes. Even more importantly, it helps with digestion and in the prevention against bloat due to the decreased intake of oxygen when eating or drinking.

Although not destructive, a Bullmastiff loves toys. They can never have enough so give them some or you will find that they make their own, including shoes, children’s toys, remote controls, etc. You get the idea.

House training

It is important not to elevate their food and water bowls, so that the puppy/dog has to reach into the bowl to eat or drink. Large breeds are subject to bloat and recent studies have found that lower food bowls seems to help with food digestion.

The type of bowls that we have the puppies/dogs eat and drink out of are stainless steel rounded bottom quart mixing bowls. The Bullmastiff has a square muzzle with a slight under bite making it is difficult for them to eat out of a flat bottom bowl. The lowered feeding system help with the development of their bites, neck and shoulder muscles, as well as, their front pasterns for tight cat-like toes. Even more importantly, it helps with digestion and in the prevention against bloat due to the decreased intake of oxygen when eating or drinking.

Although not destructive, a Bullmastiff loves toys. They can never have enough so give them some or you will find that they make their own, including shoes, children’s toys, remote controls, etc. You get the idea.:-)

Lavish praise, a trigger word (ie: "potty", "get busy", "business", "bombs away", etc.) and a treat reward immediately following his eliminating in the right place (newspapers, backyard, or outdoors) will help you to communicate to your puppy that you are pleased with his behavior. Delayed praise is not effective, so witnessing him going in the right spot is important.

Many puppies and dogs prefer certain areas or surfaces to eliminate on, such as rugs, carpeting, etc. Keep your puppy away from risky areas or surfaces whenever possible. If your puppy suddenly runs out of sight (ei: out of the room), he may be looking for a secret spot to eliminate, so close doors to rooms where he may sneak a quick pee or poop.

Generally speaking, it is advisable to take up your puppy's water bowl after 6 PM, unless he seems very thirsty or weather conditions are exceedingly hot. (But a couple of ice cubes are OK)

Additional household training

Diarrhoea will prevent housetraining success!! Your puppy or dog cannot be expected to be reliable if he has diarrhea. Loose, liquidy or mucousy stools will hinder any housetraining success.

After the fact discipline doesn’t work!! Never ever discipline (verbally or otherwise) your puppy or dog after-the-fact for house soiling accidents that you did not actually witness. (Even if you should see your puppy eliminate on the floor or carpet, harsh physical punishment is never recommended.)

Never discipline a dog for submissive urination!! Submissive and excitement urination are completely involuntary, so never discipline your puppy for this. Eye contact, verbal scoldings, hovering over, reaching out to pet your puppy's head, animated movements, talking in an exciting or loud voice, as well as strangers/ visitors approaching your puppy, may all potentially trigger your puppy to piddle. Disciplining your puppy for involuntary piddling must be avoided or the problem will simply get worse.

Exercise

The Bullmastiff is large, heavy dog, and has a great deal of growing to pack into the first 18 month of his life. For this reason, forced exercise should not be undertaken until the bones and joints have formed sufficiently to withstand actual ‘’walk’’. A play in the garden is sufficient for a puppy until he is 6 months of age. Short walks of about 10 minutes can then be given to accustom him to lead and to teach him road sense, gradually progressing to longer walk as the limbs strengthen.

Prolonged walking not be undertaken until 18 months of age. Free running in large area, such as a field, should be avoided. Do not be tempted to overexert a youngest too soon – it really is not worth risk of a permanently lame dog.

Care should also be taken in the house to prevent a puppy from climbing stairs. Should such an eventually occur, do not call him down. Go up and carry him down. Immeasurable damage can be inflicted on the shoulder joints in such situation.

Similarly, no jumping from the back of a car must be allowed until your dog is mature enough to handle it. Ease him out with one hand on his collar and the other under his chest.

A mature Bullmastiff is not demanding and will be happy to take as much or as little exercise as you are able to give him, which make him a comfortable companion to live with.

Other essential information
  • Your Bullmastiff is a family companion. This breed should not be left outside in a kennel, chained or tied outdoors. It must have a fenced yard or play area of adequate size to exercise, play and eliminate in.

  • Your dog should be socialized and obedience trained from early puppyhood to the extent that he/she is not a threat to other animals, people or property.

  • Obedience training from the age of 4 months is recommended. It is important to remember that you own your dog, he doesn’t own you. (Bullmastiff,Juliette Cunliffe,2008)



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